A chat with Wetherspoon’s Tim Martin on LBC

French Vineyard Owner Pulls Up Wetherspoon’s Boss Over No-Deal Brexit

Ran the headline on lbc.co.uk.

(The photos above are of Nick Ferrari and Tim Martin, not the vineyard owner.)

A French vineyard owner pulled up the chairman of JD Wetherspoon when he said wine would be cheaper after Brexit.

Tim Martin, who founded the popular pub chain, is a leading Brexiteer and insisted the UK has nothing to fear from a no-deal Brexit.

He told Nick Ferrari no-deal is better than Theresa May’s deal and talked of scrapping tariffs on New World wines.

He said: “If we leave the EU, one of the advantages is that we can scrap tariffs. So Gavin’s wine will continue to come into the country tariff-free, but the difference will be you’ll save 8-12p per bottle on wine from the rest of the world.

“But you save 17% on children’s clothes, you save x% on bananas, so much on oranges and all the rest of it.”

However, Gavin Quinney, who runs a 63-acre vineyard near Bordeaux, pointed out: “Tim, you’re not selling children’s clothes and bananas in Wetherspoons, you’re selling wine.

“The most you’re going to reduce a bottle of Australian wine is 8p and if the EU finishes the negotiation with Australia and removes that tariff, 8p we’re talking about on a bottle of wine, compared with the UK duty from 1st February will be £2.23 – 28-times more.

“The UK collects 63% of all excise duty on wine in the EU. It’s massive, whereas the tariff is tiny.” Keep reading

New highs with Bordeaux 2018 – and UK duty: October review


This month’s exciting review covers the Bordeaux 2018 vintage and how the weather impacted on the harvest. Below is a cutdown version of a longer article that Gavin has just put together for Jancis Robinson’s website and for Liv-ex (the London International Vintners’ Exchange).

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Bordeaux 2018 weather and harvest report

This report was also published on JancisRobinson.com and on Liv-ex.

Bordeaux 2018 will be remembered as an exceptional year, with no shortage of outstanding wines from this extraordinary vintage. The weather too has been exceptional, with a glorious summer extending long into the September and early October harvest, but the vintage had begun with a bizarrely challenging first half of the growing season. It has ended up, not for the first time, as a year of mixed fortunes.

I’ll try to explain the impact of the weather on yields and quality using – as ever in these vintage reports – a few graphs and statistics.

A dozen highlights of the out-of-the-ordinary 2018 vintage

  • A wet winter, followed by a seriously soggy spring.
  • The threat of mildew, from spring onwards, was the strongest for decades.
  • Hailstorms in May and July caused damage in some unlucky areas.
  • The flowering in May and June was largely successful.
  • A glorious summer, preceded by just enough rain in late June and early July.
  • To have three complete months of sunny, dry weather from early July through to early October is rare.
  • Optimal harvest conditions, stress free, with no risk of rot.
  • A vintage of great potential, with outstanding reds and some very good whites.
  • Balance will be key as alcohol levels are generally quite high.
  • The fourth very good to excellent vintage in a row for 75% of the leading châteaux.
  • Plentiful yields for most growers but low for those hit by mildew or hail.
  • Overall Bordeaux volumes, at a guess, are close to the 10-year average.

The growing season

Here then is the story of the vintage, using daily statistics that I’ve compiled from six different weather stations around Bordeaux.

The amount of rain can differ considerably from one area to another, and even from one commune to another, but this gives a pretty good impression of how the growing season panned out. For a comparison of 2018 with the last two vintages – and they are quite different – see the appendix below.

‘A game of two halves’

At the end of July – the month in which France won the football World Cup – I wrote that Bordeaux 2018 was ‘a game of two halves’. I have to admit I was taking a punt on the weather staying fine for August and September and even, as it happened, for early October, yet it’s extraordinary how the weather stayed so sunny and dry after such a wet start.

The stark contrast in the amount of rain for the period from March to June, compared to July, August and September, and how this compares to other vintages, can also be seen in this grid showing rainfall each month over the last ten vintages.

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September review – the sunshine harvest


This month has seen our twentieth harvest at Bauduc. We took over the grapes that were on the vines when we arrived at the start of September 1999, so we haven’t quite clocked up 20 years, but the 2018 vintage is still a (frightening) milestone. Daniel was already here, and he still has no grey hairs, while Nelly joined us as a trainee. Pictured below, they’ve both put up with us ever since. Meanwhile, Michel, above, and better known as known as Papi, had already retired back then yet he’s volunteered to help in each and every harvest, and at 85 is still going strong. There’s hope for us all yet.

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Véraison – 16 grape varieties changing colour

Every stage of the grapes’ development is fascinating to some of us but August is the month when most of the bunches change colour (véraison) in Bordeaux, so you really get a visual perspective on how the different varieties perform.

As well as the Bordeaux varieties, we have some non-Bordeaux grapes too, planted around ten years ago as an experiment. Most visitors have little idea that we’re restricted to growing only certain types of grapes, but that’s the same for all protected ‘appellations’ in France: should we wish to make wine with non-Bordeaux grapes, like Syrah or Chardonnay, this would have to be under the basic Vin de France label. (Only a tiny fraction of wine from the Gironde is Vin de France, the rest ‘Bordeaux’ or one of its 60-odd appellations.)

This is a long post below with several photos of each variety, and you certainly don’t need to know all about this stuff to enjoy a glass or two of wine. However, to give you a picture of how different grapes ripen at different times, here are several reds in the same block, taken on the same mid-August day:

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August review – grapes, harvest and friends


Another dry and unusually hot month, and the white harvest has already kicked off in the more precocious Bordeaux vineyards, namely to the south of the city in Pessac-Léognan. Most white vines, like ours, are sensibly holding back just long enough until the managers, oenologists and staff return from their holidays.

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Hail nets get the nod

The INAO, the body that controls viticulture and wine production in the protected Appellations of France, have given approval for the use of anti-hail nets following some extensive tests in Burgundy. Until now, growers in Appellation Contrôlée vineyards have not been allowed to install nets against hail because the effect on the grapes and on the vines hasn’t been properly understood and they can alter the nature of the terroir. Or something like that.

In the big picture of things, this may not seem to be especially significant news but it’s an interesting development for us and for any wine growers who have to live through the fairly regular stress of hail storm alerts. And, from time to time, the real losses from hail damage.

The successful Burgundy tests have taken three years and this coincides with the experimental nets that we installed at Bauduc in June 2015 (above). Our trials were not so much to see if they work against hail (we think they would, though mercifully they’ve not been put to the test) but to assess how long they might last, and what impact there is on the vines, the labour, and the grapes. Now that we’ve been given the feu vert, in effect, we will spend more time and effort really understanding how the grapes behind the nets perform and how they taste during this harvest, compared to the neighbouring rows. Keep reading

Bordeaux 2018 – a game of two halves

This post also appears on JancisRobinson.com and on Liv-ex, the fine wine market website.

I’ll keep the football analogies to a minimum but the end of the month in which France won the World Cup seems an appropriate moment to reflect on the pluses and minuses of the season so far. For wine growers, or viticulteurs, the business end of the season will soon be upon us.

Following on from a wet winter and a thoroughly damp spring, the start of the summer has been dry and hot. In fact, of the last 44 days, 22 have seen temperatures over 30°C around Bordeaux, with another 14 days over 28°C. July itself has been the third hottest in France since 1947, still behind 2006 and 1983 but knocking 2015 into fourth spot. Keep reading

How 2018 is looking, hail news and more… July review


A memorable month with friends, family, football and glorious weather. And, for some of us, Love Island. We’ve also had a record number of visitors to the château to taste and even to buy our wine, and there seems to have been no let-up in the number of online orders in the UK, which is great.

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